2018-07-04 / Front Page

Internet in Bloom for The Layperson

By Ted J. Bloom

Ted Bloom, MLS., MSEd., CPL.,CKMI., NP has been a published columnist in New York since 1999. A CDCR law librarian and instructor with two graduate degrees, some of his credentials include, creating and running a career preparation computer lab for at-risk youth through the U.S. Department of Labor, as well as being a NYS Notary Public, SUNY Communications Instructor, a YMCA Director and a Certified Krav Maga Instructor.  His first book The Librarian's Guide to Employment in the Information Age is now available on Amazon.com.Ted Bloom, MLS., MSEd., CPL.,CKMI., NP has been a published columnist in New York since 1999. A CDCR law librarian and instructor with two graduate degrees, some of his credentials include, creating and running a career preparation computer lab for at-risk youth through the U.S. Department of Labor, as well as being a NYS Notary Public, SUNY Communications Instructor, a YMCA Director and a Certified Krav Maga Instructor. His first book The Librarian's Guide to Employment in the Information Age is now available on Amazon.com.If you have been following Internet in Bloom for the Queens Gazette since November of 2010, you probably noticed we love to discuss Internet current events.  Lately, we have a smorgasbord of them.  Let us begin with our Supreme Court.  SCOTUS is losing another judge--Justice Kennedy, appointed during the Regan administration, who may be considered by some to be a swing voter on judicial issues, but in reality, most of his decisions have been conservative.  Supreme Court picks have a tremendous effect on US laws and politics.  Consider famous SCOTUS cases such as Rowe v. Wade, affecting a woman's right to choose to have a baby--or not.  Lately, during the Trump administration, the public's ability to form a class action has been curtailed.  Class actions are far more powerful and effective than individual court actions.  However, the Internet still offers a way for the average citizen to participate in class action decisions online.  Go to www.TopClassAction.com for details.

Moreover, the New York Times best-selling author and historian, Thom Hartmann, see www.ThomHartmann.com for details, reminds us that regardless of what our SCOTUS decrees, our Constitution clearly indicates that congress may override any Supreme Court decision, such as Citizens United or Rowe v. Wade.  Congress, www.Congress.gov, may be reached by phone at (202)224-3121 during business hours, of course.  In fact, for those of you seeking a public press analysis of why the Democrats lost in 2016, several leftist pundits discuss this at www.DemocraticAutopsy.org.  Remember, your vote is your voice.

Furthermore, library participation across the nation indicates reading is still quite popular.  See www.ala.org for statistics.  The ALA (American Library Association) site also has data and video on why book banning is still a controversial library topic.  However, if one wishes to access e-books online, do they have to pay for this service?  Not yet.  The Gutenberg press project has been around since the 1970's and has a huge number of e-books, including famous classics with illustrations.  Visit www.Gutenberg.org for details. If you seek a pay service, there is always Amazon Prime at www.Amazon.com which has an enormous selection of e-books.  Please note: At the time of this publication, Amazon Prime advertises an annual subscription price of $119.00, however this figure does not include applicable taxes.  This price is an increase from the previous one of just $99.00.  In New York or California, you can expect to pay a total of about $130.00 including taxes.  Maybe this is why Amazon CEO, Jeff Bezos is one of the richest people in the world, if not history itself?  His self-worth: Over 27 billion dollars.


 

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