2017-12-20 / Features

Dutch Kills Civic Closes Out 2017

BY THOMAS COGAN


The 114th Police Precinct Commander Captain Osvaldo Nuñez (r.) addresses the Dutch Kills Civic meeting for December. At l. is Tony Benetatos, moderating for the absent DKCA President George Stamatiades. The 114th Police Precinct Commander Captain Osvaldo Nuñez (r.) addresses the Dutch Kills Civic meeting for December. At l. is Tony Benetatos, moderating for the absent DKCA President George Stamatiades. The Dutch Kills Civic Association’s (DKCA) December meeting was its last of the year until February. As usual in the last month of the year, there was the attempt to run a brief meeting and then to enjoy a holiday season party. Tony Benetatos moderated the meeting in the absence of President George Stamatiades.

The 114th Police Precinct Commander Captain Osvaldo Nuñez made a crime report and took questions, notably one about the theft of Christmas gift packages out in the open at doorsteps. One woman said she wished communications between the DKCA and its members were better, which made Benetatos express his concern. One of Assembly Member Brian Barnwell’s representatives had an announcement about his bill to make the Average Median Income (AMI) score more effective.

Capt. Nuñez began the meeting by saying that the crime rate in the precinct continues to drop, though the persistence of felony assaults remains vexing. That near the end of the year there had been only two murders might be relatively a good thing, but then came a third, in the Ravenswood Houses, which is unsettling. A more common occurrence would be purse snatchings or swindles over the telephone, but the commander expressed frustration that people remain careless about their property or credulous to the demands of callers plainly trying to frighten them out of their money.

He said there had been a recent “IRS” phone call to some designated victim who turned out to be a prize opportunity. The victim was told the usual tale that thousands of back tax dollars were owed and could be paid back with the purchase of a money card, to be sent to the caller. This demand turned out to be about $17,000, which caused a few gasps in the audience. The victim, the commander revealed, was no senior citizen with an accumulation of savings either, but a 23-year-old!

He was questioned about the hazard of having package deliveries left on porches or residential hallways where strangers are able to steal them. He said that Amazon, UPS, Fed Ex et al. are trying to develop safe delivery points, but this year the best we can do is find friendly neighbors who can take them in while we are away. It seems that mailbox “fishing” goes on, though the captain said he had noticed a decline since about September. Steve Moreno said a recent mailbox raid got the thieves a lot of documents and checks that had been mailed by a union. The captain acknowledged that a fresh fishing breakout is possible.

Dhavneet Anand, representing Assembly Member Barnwell’s office said the assembly member’s initial bill, concerning AMI, might be voted on in the legislative session beginning in 2018. The point of the bill is to make Average Median Income, or AMI, reflect the income of the populace within one ZIP code area, or some area less than the massive one determining it now. New York’s AMI area takes in all of the city and much of the surrounding area. As a result, the income of Scarsdale in Westchester County is mixed in with that of the south Bronx, making the latter’s financial lot look better than it really is.

Return to top

Copyright 1999-2019 The Service Advertising Group, Inc. All rights reserved.