2017-12-13 / Features

Nolan Addresses Sunnyside Chamber

BY THOMAS COGAN


(L. to r., front): Susan Albenio, co-owner of Tito Rad’s; Ruth C. Hauppert of Community Board 2; Czarrinna Andres of Bing’s Gift Shop; Kenny Madrano representing Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer; Ivory Krooler children’s book author; Assembly Member Cathy Nolan; Christa Cavallaro owner of C Clearly; Kris Czerniachowitz of Sunnyside Community Services; Msgr. Jonas Achacoso of Queen of Angels R.C. Church; Thomas Cogan, Queens Gazette; (back row): Mario Albenio, co-owner of Tito Rad’s; Christian Amez of the Sunnyside Post; Ira Greenberg representing Assembly Member Nolan, Metropolitan Transportation Authority; Richard Drake, biofinancial executive (ret’d.); Charles Kellert, commercial broker; Donald Williams, electrician; Patricia Dorfman, executive director of the Sunnyside Chamber of Commerce; Peter Killeen of the Sunnyside Artists. (L. to r., front): Susan Albenio, co-owner of Tito Rad’s; Ruth C. Hauppert of Community Board 2; Czarrinna Andres of Bing’s Gift Shop; Kenny Madrano representing Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer; Ivory Krooler children’s book author; Assembly Member Cathy Nolan; Christa Cavallaro owner of C Clearly; Kris Czerniachowitz of Sunnyside Community Services; Msgr. Jonas Achacoso of Queen of Angels R.C. Church; Thomas Cogan, Queens Gazette; (back row): Mario Albenio, co-owner of Tito Rad’s; Christian Amez of the Sunnyside Post; Ira Greenberg representing Assembly Member Nolan, Metropolitan Transportation Authority; Richard Drake, biofinancial executive (ret’d.); Charles Kellert, commercial broker; Donald Williams, electrician; Patricia Dorfman, executive director of the Sunnyside Chamber of Commerce; Peter Killeen of the Sunnyside Artists. For December’s Sunnyside Chamber of Commerce meeting, Assembly Member Cathy Nolan came to Tito Rad’s Grill, 49- 10 Queens Blvd., where she met with an attentive audience remarking about the big changes she has gone through in 33 years in Albany. These days, the legislative budget is $150 billion and she can remember regarding it with awe when she was a college student and it was a mere $12 billion. Mounting expenses in the State Capitol give ordinary citizens another reason to hate the place, but while she agreed that Albany often deserves its bad name, there are many good things done there too. She did admit she was fortunate to attain the position of Education Committee chair and said it can be a discouraging thing, particularly for women politicians, to wait several years for such an opportunity to come, with no guarantee it will. Nevertheless, she maintains a “never give up” mentality. She believes the 2016 state elections generated many activists. From her standpoint as head of the Education Committee she is gratified by the amount of diversity that can be seen there. She asked if anyone had questions she might answer. Christian Amez of the Sunnyside Post asked if she knew about the new subway car currently on display at the 34th Street-Hudson Yards station. She said she wasn’t informed about it, so Ira Greenberg, former Chamber President and an advisor to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, commented that the Access Queens group of transit monitors will go to the station to look at it. Czarinna Andres asked about development in Long Island City and the homelessness it might be affecting. She said it’s a shame when the homeless are routed from their living quarters, but still opposes closing hotels and converting them to homeless shelters, which costs the city heavily. Nolan made her opinions plain on development of the Sunnyside Yard by dismissing it briskly. And please, she said, no 70-story office buildings in LIC, but that objection may be too late. As for community advisory boards, to which her staffer, Ira Greenberg, is an advisor, they should be in effect in the issue of homeless shelters. Someone asked about the BQX, (Brooklyn-Queens Connector) the proposed streetcar to run a route between Brooklyn’s Sunset Park and Astoria and back. She took no stand, pleading that she is little informed about it. In the matter of rents, she said that any proposals are “easier said than done.” After fighting for years to create a better system of rents, here also she has adopted a never-give-up attitude, since the issue seems to go on forever. She concluded by saying that Albany is rife with machinations, but she avoids infighting and caucuses, keeping her eye on her district. She said as a generality that she can get along with most of the other politicians, Democratic or Republican.

Return to top

Copyright 1999-2018 The Service Advertising Group, Inc. All rights reserved.