2017-11-15 / Front Page

Mount Sinai Brings Lifesaving Stroke Tech To Queens


Cerebrovascular stroke experts from the Mount Sinai Health System performed a thrombectomy procedure at Mount Sinai Queens (25-10 30th Avenue, Astoria) to save the life and functioning of a 92-year-old Queens resident who was suffering a major stroke, marking the first time this advanced, lifesaving technique has ever been performed in the borough of Queens. 
Photo Vinny DuPre Cerebrovascular stroke experts from the Mount Sinai Health System performed a thrombectomy procedure at Mount Sinai Queens (25-10 30th Avenue, Astoria) to save the life and functioning of a 92-year-old Queens resident who was suffering a major stroke, marking the first time this advanced, lifesaving technique has ever been performed in the borough of Queens. Photo Vinny DuPre Cerebrovascular stroke experts from the Mount Sinai Health System performed a thrombectomy procedure at Mount Sinai Queens on Friday, October 20, to save the life and functioning of a 92-year-old Queens resident who was suffering a major stroke as a result of a blood clot in her brain, marking the first time this advanced, lifesaving technique has ever been performed in the borough of Queens. Until last week, every Queens resident who has needed this kind of procedure had to be transferred out of the borough because there was no thrombectomy-capable center in Queens.


(L. to r.): Domenico Sacramone; Mario Sacramone; Johanna Fifi, MD, Director of the Endovascular Stroke Program at the Mount Sinai Hospital; Stanley Tuhrim, MD, Director of the Stroke Center at the Mount Sinai Hospital; and Maddalena Sacramone. 
Photo Courtesy of Mount Sinai Hospital (L. to r.): Domenico Sacramone; Mario Sacramone; Johanna Fifi, MD, Director of the Endovascular Stroke Program at the Mount Sinai Hospital; Stanley Tuhrim, MD, Director of the Stroke Center at the Mount Sinai Hospital; and Maddalena Sacramone. Photo Courtesy of Mount Sinai Hospital When it comes to stroke, “time is brain” because for every passing minute when blood flow to the brain is blocked, millions of neurons are lost and nearby brain tissue can be damaged. It’s estimated that nearly half of all ischemic strokes (strokes that occur when the arteries that carry blood to the brain become narrowed or blocked) are due to large vessel occlusion (LVO) of a major intracranial artery, which leave the sufferer with severe symptoms and deficits and which are often the deadliest form of stroke, partially because the standard “clot busting” drugs often prove to be ineffective for LVOs. For certain large vessel occlusion stroke patients, a procedure called thrombectomy can be performed to remove the clot and quickly restore blood flow to the brain. During a thrombectomy, a highly specialized endovascular surgeon threads a catheter through an artery in the groin up to the patient’s brain and uses a tiny mechanical device to remove the clot. A series of studies published in 2015 demonstrated a clinical benefit of thrombectomy over IV thrombolysis (clot busting drugs) but until now, that technology had not made its way to Queens.

Dr. J Mocco, M.D., Director of the Cerebrovascular Center at Mount Sinai and Vice Chair of Neurosurgery for the Mount Sinai Health System, who performed the thrombectomy procedure in the interventional radiology suite at Mount Sinai Queens, explains that this groundbreaking “first” in the borough is actually the first step in the development of a more expansive world-class stroke center that is being built at Mount Sinai Queens and slated to open in Summer 2018. This center will be designed, from the ground up, to facilitate the fastest and most high quality thrombectomy care in the world, including having the most advanced stroke imaging and treatment equipment that has been custom developed for this unique center. Mount Sinai stroke experts anticipate that having the best imaging, diagnostic ability and treatment options in one location within just a few yards of the emergency room doors will cut “door to needle” time (the time from arrival at the hospital to beginning the clot removal) by nearly 85 percent, from national targets of 90 minutes to 15 minutes.

Ninety-two-year-old Maddalena Sacramone is well known in her neighborhood, as she spends time every day in the kitchen of Sac’s Place in Astoria, a popular Italian restaurant known for their brick-oven, coal-fired pizza. It is owned and operated by two of her three sons and based on Maddalena’s own recipes and cooking. Shortly after leaving the restaurant on Friday, October 20, she called one of her sons screaming in pain and saying she didn’t feel well. Her sons rushed to her home and an ambulance brought her to Mount Sinai Queens, where she was imaged and diagnosed with two blood clots in her brain that were causing her to experience stroke symptoms, including one-sided weakness and slurred speech. Thankfully, she was taken to the right place at the right time; once the hospital determined she was having a stroke, they called Mount Sinai endovascular stroke expert Dr. Mocco, who got into a cab and rushed to Mount Sinai Queens to perform a thrombectomy procedure, saving time and therefore saving brain. He and his surgical team successfully removed blood clots from two different parts of Maddalena’s brain and less than a week later, Mrs. Sacramone’s mobility and speech is back to full functioning. She is likely to be discharged from the hospital within the next few days and her family couldn’t be more grateful that the best stroke care was brought to her, right in her own neighborhood.

Mount Sinai Queens is located at 25-10 30th Avenue, Astoria.

Return to top

Copyright 1999-2018 The Service Advertising Group, Inc. All rights reserved.