2017-11-01 / Star Journal

Presenting Pages From The Long Island Star Journal

COMPILED BY DAN MCDONALD

Welcome To November 1965!

In far-off Vietnam, outnumbered American forces were engaged in a life and death struggle with North Vietnamese troops in the Battle of Ia Drang. After both sides suffered heavy casualties, North Vietnam decided to avoid direct encounters with the U.S. military and employ guerrilla warfare against their technologically superior foe. Among the survivors on the American side was Lieutenant Rick Rescorla, who perished in the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 while guiding his coworkers to safety.

Back home in New York City, on November 2 Republican John V. Lindsay was elected mayor, narrowly defeating former Richmond Hill High School teacher Abe Beame, who went on to serve as mayor himself in the 1970s.

That same month, an improperly set circuit breaker at a power station in Ontario, Canada caused a massive electrical outage that plunged two Canadian provinces and much of the Northeastern United States into darkness on November 9.


John V. Lindsay was elected mayor, narrowly defeating former Richmond Hill High School teacher Abe Beame, who went on to serve as mayor himself in the 1970s. John V. Lindsay was elected mayor, narrowly defeating former Richmond Hill High School teacher Abe Beame, who went on to serve as mayor himself in the 1970s. Out in Queens, Con Ed set up emergency generators in public facilities, including hospitals, to make it through the critical hours without power.

The Vietnam War was also fought on the home front at American dinner tables and was perhaps the first conflict to appear in our living rooms on the nightly news. Queens was by no means isolated from the great human suffering of the decades-long war. On November 4 a searing image came across the AP newswire of a female news correspondent lying mortally wounded on a battlefield in Vietnam with a priest over her administering last rites. Dickie Chapelle, former Queens resident and veteran of the Battle of Okinawa and the Hungarian Uprising of 1956, was buried with full military honors. A plaque left near the site of her death said, “She was one of us and we will miss her."

The 1960s were a decade of change. The nation was swept by anti-war protests and the civil rights and women’s rights movements. Those fighting for a more just, equal nation encountered great hatred and bigotry. In November, the Long Island Star Journal reported that Queens native and prominent Ku Klux Klan member, Dan Burros, had committed suicide the previous month after a New York Times article made public his Jewish heritage. The 2001 movie, “The Believer,” starring Ryan Gosling as a Jewish neo- Nazi, was based on the life of Burros.

That November, a Queens College instructor spoke out against ugliness of a much different sort. Calling the new apartment blocks springing up around Forest Hills “drab and unimaginative canyons of terraced barracks,” Murray Polner decried the modern architecture and development that he claimed was killing the green spaces and historical significance of Queens. “What’s happened in Forest Hills,” he went on, “is what’s happened in Bayside and what’s happened in Flushing. They are victims of uncontrolled expansion.” The professor didn’t lay the blame for this “uglification” on greedy real estate developers or venal politicians, however.

According to Polner, the culprit was apathy.

That’s the way it was in November 1965!

For further information, contact the Greater Astoria Historical Society at 718-278-0700 or visit our website at www.astorialic.org.

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