2017-09-27 / Front Page

Queens County Republicans Tour Historic Seguine Mansion

Peacocks roam the property of the Seguine mansion in Staten Island.PHOTOS JASON D. ANTOSPeacocks roam the property of the Seguine mansion in Staten Island.PHOTOS JASON D. ANTOSThe Queens Village Republican Club led a group of civic- and historic-minded enthusiasts on its third annual historic bus tour. Departing from Queens County Farm Museum in Bellerose, the all-day tour explored the historic treasures of one of the least explored boroughs of New York City.

The first destination was the Seguine Mansion, a 27-acre, George Burke, private owner of the 200-year-old Seguine mansion, gave a private tour of the home to Queens Village Republican Club.




 George Burke, private owner of the 200-year-old Seguine mansion, gave a private tour of the home to Queens Village Republican Club. southern-style plantation built in 1838. Purchased by James Seguine in 1786 overlooking the Prince’s Bay, the home was built by his son, Joseph. The Seguine family made their fortune in Oystering and built the house using the construction techniques of the French Huguenots. The Huguenots were members of the Reformed Church of France who came to America, like many other ethno-religious groups, seeking religious freedom.

Incredibly, the mansion is still in the hands of a private owner, George Burke. Recently Mr. Burke donated the home to the City of New York with the stipulation that he live out his life in the mansion that he has painstakingly restored and cared for. The interior of the home is filled with a collection of antiques and period furniture. The property is surrounded by peacocks, which made their presence known with a series of loud squawks.

The interior of Seguine mansion is filled with period furniture and antiques from Mr. Burke’s collection.The interior of Seguine mansion is filled with period furniture and antiques from Mr. Burke’s collection.The next stop was the Chinese Scholar’s Garden located at the Snug Harbor Cultural Center followed by lunch at the Basilio Inn Restaurant, the oldest restaurant in Staten Island, opened in 1921. The structure was originally built as a carriage house for horses in 1850.

Jim Trent, founder of the Queens Farm Museum, said that the trip to the Seguine mansion was a unique experience since the home is still privately owned and therefore any visitors must be invited.

—Jason D. Antos

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