2017-09-06 / Front Page

A Queens’ Eye View Of Solar Eclipse 2017

The eclipse was viewed by tens of millions of people on August 21. For those not able to get a hold of the special U/V glasses to witness the event, household objects including cereal boxes were made into projectors of the sun’s reflection. Here, Astoria resident Sanda Burburan views the eclipse through a homemade projector, made out of a box of Cocoa Pebbles. 

Photos Jason D. AntosThe eclipse was viewed by tens of millions of people on August 21. For those not able to get a hold of the special U/V glasses to witness the event, household objects including cereal boxes were made into projectors of the sun’s reflection. Here, Astoria resident Sanda Burburan views the eclipse through a homemade projector, made out of a box of Cocoa Pebbles. Photos Jason D. AntosQueens residents witnessed a celestial phenomenon on August 21. Starting at 1:23 pm and ending around 4 pm, the sun was covered three quarters of the way by the moon in an almost complete solar eclipse. The peak of the event happened around 2:45 pm. The full eclipse was seen mainly from the northwestern to the southeastern parts of the country, the first time since June 8, 1918.

Queens was ready for the event with many branches of The reflection of tree branches and leaves on the sidewalk were also a good way to see the eclipse. Here the sunlight through the leaves morphed into reflections of dozens of crescent shapes as the eclipse progressed.  
The reflection of tree branches and leaves on the sidewalk were also a good way to see the eclipse. Here the sunlight through the leaves morphed into reflections of dozens of crescent shapes as the eclipse progressed. the Queens Library giving away special glasses donated by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s “NASA @ My Library” initiative.

For many not able to get ahold of these special glasses, homemade viewing devices came in handy, including spaghetti strainers and cereal boxes.

The next solar event will occur in 2,426 days, on April 8, 2024 when a total solar eclipse will turn day into night in Upstate New York.

–Jason D. Antos


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