2017-02-01 / Front Page

Internet in Bloom for The Layperson

By Ted J. Bloom

Ted Bloom, MLS., MSEd., CPL.,CKMI., NP has been a published columnist in New York since 1999. A librarian and professor with two graduate degrees, some of his credentials include, creating and running a career preparation computer lab for at-risk youth through the U.S. Department of Labor, as well as being a NYS Notary Public, SUNY Communications Instructor, a YMCA Director and a Certified Krav Maga Instructor.  His first book The Librarian's Guide to Employment in the Information Age is now available on Amazon.com.Ted Bloom, MLS., MSEd., CPL.,CKMI., NP has been a published columnist in New York since 1999. A librarian and professor with two graduate degrees, some of his credentials include, creating and running a career preparation computer lab for at-risk youth through the U.S. Department of Labor, as well as being a NYS Notary Public, SUNY Communications Instructor, a YMCA Director and a Certified Krav Maga Instructor. His first book The Librarian's Guide to Employment in the Information Age is now available on Amazon.com.Tort: An injury to one person for which the person who caused the injury is legally responsible. A tort can be intentional -- for example, an angry punch in the nose -- but is far more likely to result from carelessness (called "negligence"), such as riding your bicycle on the sidewalk and colliding with a pedestrian. While the injury that forms the basis of a tort is usually physical, this is not a requirement -- libel, slander, and the "intentional infliction of mental distress" are on a good-sized list of torts not based on a physical injury. A tort is a civil wrong, as opposed to a criminal wrong. 

Please note: The above definition is a sample from www.nolo.com/dictionary free legal dictionary.  Other excellent free legal dictionaries online include: www.thefreedictionary.com and thelawdictionary.org featuring Black's Law Dictionary (free online second edition) found in many law university libraries.

Moreover, why should you learn about the law?  The American Museum of Tort Law in-person or online will explain.  Visit www.tortmuseum.org to see the creation of Ralph Nader, the former third party presidential candidate and famous consumer advocate, and other experts, to find out why tort law is so crucial and historic.  The museum is located at: 654 Main St., Winsted, Connecticut 06098.  Their phone number is: 860-379-0505.  Take the online tour or browse through a few related cases.  One example of tort law changing history and protecting countless others: Remember Joe Camel and the Marlboro Man? Cigarette manufacturers do not use them in their ads anymore, because a series of lawsuits beginning in the 1980s have succeeded in holding Big Tobacco companies accountable for their dangerous products and in making them change some of their practices.

Furthermore, when was the last time you checked your credit history in case you need to purchase a home, a car, secure a loan or just remain solvent if your credit is checked by a potential employer or landlord or financial institution?  If it has been a while I suggest you contact our three credit bureaus in the US every four months or at least once a year to insure they have not made any mistakes in recording your transactions, addresses or other personal data:  www.experian.com, www.equifax.com and www.transunion.com before our next big economic crash.  This may be accomplished online.  Vigilance. 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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