2017-01-04 / Book Review

Sunnyside Yard and Hell Gate Bridge History Featured In Long Overdue Book

BY JASON D. ANTOS


“Sunnyside Yard and Hell Gate Bridge” for $21.99 at amazon.com and Barnes & Noble and online at arcadiapublishing.com. “Sunnyside Yard and Hell Gate Bridge” for $21.99 at amazon.com and Barnes & Noble and online at arcadiapublishing.com. Just in time to mark the centennial celebration of the Hell Gate Bridge comes a literary labor of love from author and railroad historian David D. Morrison.

“Sunnyside Yard and Hell Gate Bridge,” released by Arcadia Publishing, is a photographic journey of the yards and the famous span (the latter built by Gustav Lindenthal in 1917).

Morrison, a retired branch line manager of the Long Island Rail Road has penned three other books including one on Jamaica Station (also published by Arcadia Publishing). The book features images, many never before published, of the people, sites, landmarks and locomotives that were seen at the Sunnyside Yards, and which also crossed the magnificent span of the Hell Gate.

One major feature, which New York City history buffs will enjoy about this book, are the photos of the Sunnyside Yards which are rarely shown and feature so many interesting details about its creation in the late 1800s and its golden era during the 1930s/40s.

The Sunnyside Yards and Hell Gate Bridge share the same history as they were both part of an ambitious project by the Pennsylvania Railroad and the New Haven Rail Road in their efforts to create a New York Extension, originating at Penn Station. Trains would depart from there and travel inside of two tunnels under the Hudson River and four under the East River. The trains then entered the two-mile-long yard at Sunnyside before being linked to New England via the Hell Gate, a steel arch bridge measuring 1,017 feet between each support tower with four tracks running across a deck 350 feet above the East River. For its time, the Hell Gate Bridge was the largest railroad bridge in the world.

Rare images are culled from Morrison’s collection as well as from the archive of fellow train historian John Turkeli, who helped provide images of the Sunnyside Yard.

Morrison is current Co-Chair of the Oyster Bay Railroad Station Restoration Committee.

Train lovers and history buffs can purchase “Sunnyside Yard and Hell Gate Bridge” for $21.99 at amazon.com and Barnes & Noble and online at arcadiapublishing.com.

Morrison successfully captures the epic history of one of the city’s most import railroad legacies.

Return to top

Copyright 1999-2018 The Service Advertising Group, Inc. All rights reserved.