2016-11-02 / Features

D.I. Fortune Previews New 114th Pct. Zones

BY THOMAS COGAN

The 114th Pct. once comprised of 15 sectors, has now been brought down to four sectors. The new sectors are now labeled A through D, or Adam, Boy, Charlie and David. Each has two NCOs, or neighborhood cooperation officers, whom D.I. Peter Fortune called “the most well rounded officers” in the command.The 114th Pct. once comprised of 15 sectors, has now been brought down to four sectors. The new sectors are now labeled A through D, or Adam, Boy, Charlie and David. Each has two NCOs, or neighborhood cooperation officers, whom D.I. Peter Fortune called “the most well rounded officers” in the command.
For the past few weeks, Commander Deputy Inspector Peter Fortune of the 114th Police Precinct has been publicizing the neighborhood-based policing program proposed for all the city’s precincts, since his precinct is to be one of the early adopters of it.

At a meeting at Riccardo’s by the Bridge in Astoria on October 27, a two-hour presentation of the plan was made before an assembly of neighborhood residents and local activists.

Chief of Patrol Terence A. Monahan, who spoke of greater harmony between the police and the neighborhoods they patrol, conducted most of the meeting.

Beginning with his opening statement, Chief Monahan tried to assure his listeners that it would work when he said, “This program is absolutely ideal for this neighborhood.”

Chief Monahan also said, “It’s not the same city it was in the early 1990s,” and when a woman in the audience countered, “Thank God!” He was in agreement.

One thing that will be altered by this plan is the constant shifting of officers all over the precinct, almost on a daily basis, not to mention arbitrary reassignments to temporary duties such as crowd control at athletic events and rock concerts. The small teams in sector cars will be there on a permanent basis, for patrolling but also for interacting with residents and business owners in the neighborhood on a more concentrated basis than before.

This would be not only to handle disagreements or clashes but also to practice the preventive medicine of hearing complaints and even taking advice from civilians in their sector.

It’s a matter of “meeting the community” on the part of the officers, and “the community meeting the police,” Chief Monahan said.

Traditionally, all precincts have been divided into sectors. The 114th Pct., for instance, recently comprised 15 sectors. That is changing radically, the number for the 114th having been brought down to four sectors. With the reorganization, these simply become sectors A through D, or Adam, Boy, Charlie and David. Each has two NCOs, or neighborhood cooperation officers, whom Fortune called “the most well rounded officers” in the command.

Additionally, the precinct’s specialized units have been rearranged by Fortune, who redeployed four sergeants and 46 patrol officers, asserting that the new alignment doubles the precinct’s crime-fighting force.

The plan takes in the Police Service Area 9 unit, or PSA 9, which patrols six housing projects in Patrol Borough Queens North and PBQ South. Two NCOs are assigned to each project and all are under a supervising NCO sergeant.

Chief Monahan said there’s a training program for all NCOs, principally a criminal investigation course that lasts two weeks, but there’s also a four-day course on NCO deportment and another four-day course on mediation. He made sure to mention dealing with the mentally disturbed, a timely reference after the Deborah Danner incident in the Bronx the week before. There is training on how to lessen the peril of potentially violent situations, Chief Monahan said, and if the Danner case should represent failure of application, better training might bring better results another time.

A woman made a complaint about her recent run-in with a police officer that was nothing dangerous to either of them but, she said, was upsetting to her because the officer impressed her as rude and bullying, certainly more than he had to be. Chief Monahan said sector cops will be limited to their sectors, and would gradually become familiar in sector neighborhoods, where they could hardly be locally effective while exhibiting an irascible attitude.

Fortune took time during the meeting to introduce the NCOs of the 114th Precinct steady sectors and those of PSA 9, after which the NCOs said a few words and engaged in discussion with neighborhood residents. The assigned NCOs of Sector Adam, bounded by a winding Northern Boulevard, Steinway Street and the Grand Central Parkway are: Marius Krala and Thomas Lewandowski; NCOs of Sector Boy, bounded by the East River, Hoyt Avenue South/Astoria Boulevard and the Grand Central Parkway are: Apostolos Masouridis and Monique Holly.

The NCOs of Sector Charlie, bounded by Steinway Street, Northern Boulevard, Queens Plaza North, 21st Street and Astoria Boulevard are: Borys Bedoya and Cole Ferraro; NCOs of Sector David, including Roosevelt Island and otherwise bounded by 21st Street, Queens Plaza North, the East River and Hoyt Avenue South are: Keith Matthes and Joseph Esposito.

In PSA 9, the NCO sergeant is Sgt. Anthony Bruno. In Patrol Borough Queens North, the NCOs for Astoria Houses are Essence McDonald and Michael Roberts; in Ravenswood Houses, the NCOs are Levi Stewart and Tamisha Hoyte; in Queensbridge Houses the NCOs are Clyde Gabriel and Roland Matthews; and in Woodside Houses the NCOs are Kevin Healy and Jason Carman.

In Patrol Borough Queens South, the NCOs for South Jamaica Houses are William Carey and Stephanie Vacchio; and for Baisley Houses the NCOs are Manet Alabre and Rodriguez Dufresne.

The results of the experiments, they reported, were promising enough to begin spreading the program to all the city’s precincts.

So has begun, what Asst. Chief Rodney Harrison, Executive Officer of the patrol services bureau, told the audience was “a step, a leap, a lunge into the future.”

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