2016-04-13 / Political Page

April 19… Terrific Tuesday

Expect Clinton-Sanders, Trump-Cruz Photo Finishes


Relations between Clinton and Sanders, left, have generally been good, including in their several debates, where they have avoided personal or embarrassing attacks. But those rules have been gradually loosened as the race between them has tightened and is reaching the closing stages. Relations between Clinton and Sanders, left, have generally been good, including in their several debates, where they have avoided personal or embarrassing attacks. But those rules have been gradually loosened as the race between them has tightened and is reaching the closing stages. The 2016 election year – a political junkie’s delight – got the usual send-off with the legendary Iowa caucuses in late February, and Hillary Clinton defeated Bernie Sanders after several recounts, and Donald Trump’s debut was spoiled by Ted Cruz’ surprise victory.

Now, the New York state presidential primaries are to be decided next Tuesday as Democrats and Republicans from Queens and throughout the state are set to cast ballots that will determine the head-to-head contests still being waged by Clinton and Sanders and Trump and Cruz.

The polls will be open next Tuesday from 6 am to 9 pm. As for the Gazette’s chronicling of these bitterly fought contests, we will continue the Clinton- Sanders narrative from this point, and the simmering Trump-Cruz battle will be dealt with elsewhere in a separate story in this issue.


Cruz, right, is coming off a great victory in the Wisconsin primary, and is planning to build a “grassroots army” to challenge Trump he stated. He has also said that he doesn’t have to beat Trump in every primary just in states he’s not expected to win to just capture enough votes to win enough delegates to deprive Trump of the delegate amounts he needs to win the nomination. Cruz, right, is coming off a great victory in the Wisconsin primary, and is planning to build a “grassroots army” to challenge Trump he stated. He has also said that he doesn’t have to beat Trump in every primary just in states he’s not expected to win to just capture enough votes to win enough delegates to deprive Trump of the delegate amounts he needs to win the nomination. In the period leading up to the Iowa caucuses Clinton, who had been regarded as the successor to President Barack Obama, was naturally leading the Democratic presidential polls in early 2015. At the time, Sanders was pretty much regarded as a little known U.S. senator from Vermont and trailed far behind Clinton in the presidential polling at the time.

But the results of the Iowa caucuses, which made it difficult to determine the winner between him and Clinton, forced observers to ask, “who’s this guy Sanders?” So naturally, political fans began tracking the Clinton- Sanders primaries in early states. Clinton had the early advantage and opened a comfortable lead. But gradually, as Sanders was beginning to gain recognition, he started winning some state primaries until he recently ran off a streak of 7 or 8 consecutive victories, and it frankly was getting to be somewhat embarrassing for Clinton, which put their situation where it is now.

The most recent polls, as of last Wednesday, showed Sanders ahead of Clinton, 49 to 47 percent in a McClatchy/Marist Poll. But in a count of delegates accumulated by each in state elections Clinton is far ahead of Sanders. Clinton has 1,749 delegates to Sanders’ 1,058. Breaking it down, Clinton has 1,280 delegates plus 469 super delegates, and Sanders has 1,027 delegates plus 31 superdelegates.

To win the Democratic Party nomination for president, it goes to the candidate who wins 2,383 delegates.

In the balloting to be done by Democrats in the April 19 statewide primary, the winner between Clinton and Sanders will be awarded 247 delegates. None of these are super delegates. They are awarded by the party’s National Committee.

Relations between Clinton and Sanders have generally been good, including in their several debates, where they have avoided personal or embarrassing attacks. But those rules have been gradually loosened as the race between them has tightened and is reaching the closing stages.

As the combatants get closer to next Tuesday’s elections, relations between them have deteriorated somewhat further still because the prize of 247 delegates, if won by Clinton, will put her very close to reaching the winning target of 2,383 delegates to become the nominee.

Yet Clinton can’t be very comfortable when her previous lead over Sanders, which was astronomical earlier, is now only 12 points (54% to 42%) a double-digit lead confirmed by the most recent poll by NY Fox News. On top of that, Sanders is charging her with being unqualified to be president.

But Sanders, in an interview with the Daily News, was asked if victims assaulted with guns should be able to sue gun manufacturers, and he responded, “No, I don’t.”

Immediately, Clinton was tying that into the Sandy Hook massacre as Clinton blasted back, “For Sanders to say that the Sandy Hook families should be barred from court is wrong.”

Bringing up Sanders’ anti-gun control position, opened the door for him to repeatedly criticize Clinton’s overly friendly relationship with Wall Street as he campaigned in Brooklyn and The Bronx, never forgetting to remind the crowds following him about the huge sums the Wall Streeters paid her for delivering speeches there.

And Clinton shot back that his speeches about campaign finance reform, making college admissions free and open to everyone, income inequality and others, would not have a chance of being enacted. But that didn’t stop him from continuing to talk about them, as well as his opposition to the Iraq War, which he reminds his listeners that Clinton voted for.

But after April 5, Sanders definitely had the bragging rights as Wisconsin Democrats crowned him as winner of their state’s primary election, his latest in a string of victories over Clinton.

Clinton was happy to be back in New York, the state she had represented in the U.S. Senate from 2000 to 2008, when she resigned to become Secretary of State in the Obama administration.

GOP TO PICK PREZ CHOICE; DEMS WILL PICK DELEGATES: Next Tuesday, April 19, is Primary Day throughout New York State, and elections will be held in various places to vote for candidates or delegates who will be involved with our next presidential election next November 8.

Here in Queens we’ll have a little of each.

Republicans will vote directly to designate who will be the party’s choice of a presidential candidate for next November. Republican voters will pick from among Donald Trump, U.S. Senator Ted Cruz, from Texas, and Ohio Governor John Kasich.

Queens Democrats will vote for their choice of a presidential candidate between Hillary Clinton and U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont. Dem voters will also choose from between slates of presidential delegates, and will either vote to choose the Clinton slate or the Sanders slate, and the winning slates will then attend the party’s convention of delegates in July in Philadelphia, where the delegates will again vote for candidate choices.

Among the Clinton delegates are: 3rd CD: Thomas Suozzi, Glen Cove; 5th CD; Leroy Comrie, David Weprin; 6th DC: Elizabeth Crowley, Paul Vallone, Karen Koslowitz; 14th CD: Julissa Ferreras, Michael Gianaris, James Vacca, Anna Marie Anzalone, Francisco Moya.

Clinton and Sanders have been battling every Tuesday in various states and the results determine how many delegates go to the winner and loser. So the voting scheduled by Democrats next Tuesday seems like extra effort, but the individuals involved don’t seem to mind.

Meanwhile, the Gazette has endorsed Clinton as the Democratic presidential choice and Trump as the Republican presidential choice. Readers can find those endorsements in this issue.

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