2016-03-16 / Front Page

Woodside Street Co-Named ‘Alice Cardona Way’

In honor of the remarkable strides Alice Cardona achieved for women, Latinas, and children in New York City, City Council Majority Leader Jimmy Van Bramer passed legislation co-naming 56th Street between Woodside and Skillman Avenues “Alice Cardona Way.” The new street name was unveiled by Cardona’s family, friends, Van Bramer, City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, Assemblywoman Catherine Nolan and the community.
Photo John McCarten, New York City Council Press OfficeIn honor of the remarkable strides Alice Cardona achieved for women, Latinas, and children in New York City, City Council Majority Leader Jimmy Van Bramer passed legislation co-naming 56th Street between Woodside and Skillman Avenues “Alice Cardona Way.” The new street name was unveiled by Cardona’s family, friends, Van Bramer, City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, Assemblywoman Catherine Nolan and the community. Photo John McCarten, New York City Council Press OfficeCity Council Majority Leader Jimmy Van Bramer, Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, Assemblywoman Cathy Nolan, Community Board 2, friends, and family participated in a ceremony unveiling “Alice Cardona Way,” co-naming 56th Street between Woodside Avenue and Skillman Avenue.


Alice Cardona was a lifelong advocate for women’s rights, bilingual education, and Latina advancement. She was involved in New York City’s first Head Start program, a counselor for ASPIRA, and an active member of the National Conference of Puerto Rican Women. She also co-founded HACER/Hispanic Women’s Center, to help Latinas achieve their professional goals.

Ms. Cardona was the Assistant Director of the New York State Division for Women during Mario Cuomo’s administration. In this position, she advocated for bilingual education, women’s rights, and fought to combat HIV/AIDS, breast cancer, and domestic violence.

In her retirement, Cardona served as the Director of the Puerto Rican Association for Community Affairs and Co-Directed Atrévete, a group dedicated to voter registration and political participation. She was Board member of the National Women’s Political Caucus, National Association for Bilingual Education, and the Puerto Rican Educators Association. She was also the first Latina to receive the Susan B. Anthony Prize.

“Alice Cardona dedicated her life to helping others and bettering conditions for women—especially Latinas—and children in New York City,” said Van Bramer. “It’s fair to say that our city would not be where it is without her. This street co-naming is just a small part of her legacy, which lives on in the thousands of New Yorkers she touched.”

“Alice Cardona was an exemplary leader: making her mark in the Latino community, fighting for the disenfranchised and women’s rights,” said Mark-Viverito. “I was lucky to have known and been inspired by Alice Cardona through her work and dedication to the community. I hope that when people look up and wonder, who is Alice Cardona, people will say a great pioneer for our city. I’m proud to join Majority Leader Van Bramer and my colleagues to co-name this street in her honor.”

“It was a pleasure to work with Alice Cardona,” said Assemblywoman Catherine Nolan. “I learned a lot from Alice, her commitment to women, her Puerto Rican heritage and culture, her strong love for her family and friends are all part of my memories of Alice. I miss her and thank Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer for honoring her with a street co-naming.”

“We’re very proud that Alice has been recognized in this way,” said Diana Cruz, Alice Cardona’s sister. “Alice showed that one individual does have a large impact on a community. Today’s event is proof of this.”


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