2015-09-30 / Front Page

Internet in Bloom For The Layperson

By Ted J. Bloom

Ted J. Bloom, MLS., MSEd., CPL.,CKMI., has been a published columnist in New York since 1999. A college librarian and professor in Downtown Brooklyn and Manhattan with two graduate degrees, some of his credentials include, creating and running a career preparation computer lab for at-risk youth through the U.S. Department of Labor, as well as being a SUNY Communications Instructor, a YMCA Director and a Certified Krav Maga Instructor.  His first book The Librarian's Guide to Employment in the Information Age is now available on Amazon.com and iTunes.Ted J. Bloom, MLS., MSEd., CPL.,CKMI., has been a published columnist in New York since 1999. A college librarian and professor in Downtown Brooklyn and Manhattan with two graduate degrees, some of his credentials include, creating and running a career preparation computer lab for at-risk youth through the U.S. Department of Labor, as well as being a SUNY Communications Instructor, a YMCA Director and a Certified Krav Maga Instructor. His first book The Librarian's Guide to Employment in the Information Age is now available on Amazon.com and iTunes.Today I got onto a crowded Q train car and watched as several passengers of both genders proceeded to squeeze past me to slide two metal door handles sideways and walk between the subway cars while the train was moving at a fast pace, ignoring the large "Do not cross between cars sign" with its prominent, universal red circle with the diagonal line through it.  Shortly thereafter a young boy pointed to the sign and asked his mom why the sign was there.  I know a few train conductors so I answered the child politely, who could not have been more than ten years old, as his mom was not saying anything.  "That sign is to keep people from dying as they cross between the moving train cars."  Yes, dying: http://web.mta.info/safety is an informative website for safety tips, videos and statistics, such as in 2012, 141 people were struck by MTA subway trains in NYC and 55 were killed.  You name it, it has happened in the subway.  One local newspaper headline reads: 'Man Falls to Death While Defecating Between Subway Cars.'   Most years, suicides outnumber murders and accidental deaths on the MTA. One good bump or hard turn or unexpected hard braking is all it takes to throw one off the train when crossing between moving cars, whether the train is above or below ground.

Speaking of accidents, self-defense includes protecting oneself and one's loved ones from accidents, such as falling.  The cinema may lead the public to think that self-defense is reserved for stoic martial artists surrounded by mean looking enemies with weapons or maybe fighting off hungry sharks because of a shipwreck.  Really.  According to the media and entertainment website www.Mashable.com, more people died from taking "selfies" with their cellphones than from shark attacks this year.  Tell that to Steven Spielberg, director of the iconic movie Jaws, made in 1975.

Moreover, most of the people I see ignoring their surroundings by wearing headphones or ear-buds while biking or skateboarding or texting others with nominal communications while walking, are our nation's youth.  Hence, I have a recommended site for all to study: www.Dailyaudiobible.com by Brian Hardin.  Any librarian will tell you the most popular book in history is the bible.  With so many people bent on killing themselves needlessly, the public might as well brush up on the most famous published interpretation of what comes after death.  Regardless of one's religion or lack of it, when you are at the pearly gates faced with the book of life and a famous religious figure, you may wish to know what to expect.  Thou shall not murder.  Love thy neighbor.  Do un to others...these are universal themes in all religions.  The amount of work Brian Hardin put into the site is astounding.  He is a talented reader, as you will hear daily biblical excerpts for free.  These may even be downloaded into your PDAs (Portable Digital Assistant).  Until next column, duck 'n' cover.


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