2012-12-05 / Features

NYHQ And Manhattan College Build Green Roof


Workers are unloading and placing trays of sedum, plants that will cover a half acre of roofing at New York Hospital Queens, as part of a green roof project which is intended to reduce storm water runoff in the area. The green roof project is being funded by a DEP grant secured by Manhattan College, who will be studying the effects. Workers are unloading and placing trays of sedum, plants that will cover a half acre of roofing at New York Hospital Queens, as part of a green roof project which is intended to reduce storm water runoff in the area. The green roof project is being funded by a DEP grant secured by Manhattan College, who will be studying the effects. With climate change undeniable in the aftermath of superstorm Hurricane Sandy, the importance of environment-friendly buildings, along with water and energy conservation, going green isn’t just being discussed, it is being done.

This month at New York Hospital Queens (NYHQ), installation began on approximately a half acre of green roof. The new green roof areas, consisting of many trays of plants called sedum will be visible from several vantage points throughout NYHQ, including many patients’ rooms in the hospital’s North and West buildings and the Mother/Baby unit. The hospital, as part of a grant from the Flushing and Gowanus Green Infrastructure Grant Initiative by the New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), is installing a modular green roof.

The DEP grant program was created in order to integrate the use of green infrastructure projects to regulate and capture storm water runoff, decreasing the amount of storm water and wastewater that is diverted into New York City’s adjacent waterways, thus improving the quality of the water in local tributaries, canals and basins. Runoff is clean water that ends up in the sewage treatment plants, overloading them unnecessarily and causing untreated sewage to overflow into surrounding waterways. Manhattan College will be measuring and studying the impact of the green roof on the area’s water.

Green roofs are being used all over the world and if installed extensively enough, can potentially lower average temperatures in cities. Maintenance is low to virtually nonexistent, even in times of drought.

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