2012-10-24 / Front Page

Vallone To DOT—Fix The GCP


Traffic on the Grand Central Parkway is heavy in both directions due to roadwork projects performed by the Department of Transportation (DOT). The DOT, currently performing a 10-year road work project near the Kew Gardens Interchange, claims that it may not be able to tackle multiple projects to help alleviate congestion due to lack of additional funding. 
Photo Jason D. Antos Traffic on the Grand Central Parkway is heavy in both directions due to roadwork projects performed by the Department of Transportation (DOT). The DOT, currently performing a 10-year road work project near the Kew Gardens Interchange, claims that it may not be able to tackle multiple projects to help alleviate congestion due to lack of additional funding. Photo Jason D. Antos On October 15, Councilmember Peter F. Vallone Jr. joined Queens Borough President Helen Marshall and other elected officials at the Queens Borough Board Meeting at Borough Hall.

The MTA, New York State Attorney General’s Office and New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT) all gave presentations during the meeting, which featured representatives from both city and state agencies.

During NYSDOT’s presentation, Vallone questioned the representatives about the dangerous traffic conditions where the eastbound Grand Central Parkway (GCP) enters the Jackie Robinson Parkway. At this location, two lanes of traffic exit toward the Jackie Robinson Parkway, and the exit ramp eventually becomes a one-lane entrance to the Jackie Robinson with a stop sign at the end, resulting in massive traffic jams on the eastbound GCP.

Vallone has already written multiple letters to the state DOT asking them to alleviate the traffic congestion, and he took the opportunity to follow up at the Queens Borough Board meeting.

State DOT is currently performing a 10- year road work project several hundred feet away at the Kew Gardens Interchange, and the councilmember asked why the issue on the eastbound GCP could not also be remedied. The state DOT responded by saying they were aware of the problem but did not have the additional funding to address it, which Vallone feels is completely unacceptable.

“State DOT is performing a massive work project nearby—it makes no sense that they would not also address one of the worst traffic bottlenecks in Queens,” said Vallone. “It is ridiculous to ask people to suffer through these hazardous and frustrating traffic conditions without an end in sight.”

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