2012-09-12 / Front Page

In Remembrance Of 9/11

By Jason D. Antos


An enormous American flag is displayed along 34th Avenue between 43rd and 44th Streets in Long Island City in remembrance of the September 11 terrorist attacks. The flag belonged to the late Salvatore Merendino. Originally flown on Father’s Day and the Fourth of July, his son Roberto, continues the tradition. 
DuPreVinnyPhoto An enormous American flag is displayed along 34th Avenue between 43rd and 44th Streets in Long Island City in remembrance of the September 11 terrorist attacks. The flag belonged to the late Salvatore Merendino. Originally flown on Father’s Day and the Fourth of July, his son Roberto, continues the tradition. DuPreVinnyPhoto Yesterday, Tuesday, September 11 marked the 11th anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon.

People around the city, country and the world gathered to partake in the numerous memorials honoring the more than 3,000 who perished.

At the World Trade Center, family and victims along with personnel from various city agencies, especially the FDNY and NYPD, met at the memorial site built into the footprints of the Twin Towers to honor the names of the lost with a roll call that is read every year.

This Tuesday was special in that it marked the second time the anniversary of the attacks fell on the same day of the week as the event itself. Even the weather was eerily reminiscent of that day with the same clear blue sky and the comfortable temperature in the mid 70s.

On that fateful day, the Western Queens Gazette was getting ready to go to press when, suddenly, its staff and publisher heard of the late breaking news that commer- cial airplanes, American Airlines Flight 11 and United

Airlines Flight 175 had been flown into the North and South towers of the World Trade Center and that American Airlines Flight 77 hit the Pentagon and United Airlines Flight 93 was crashed into a field in Pennsylvania. They realized the World would never be the same again.

A total of 3,497 persons perished.

Many ceremonies around the world remembered the lost in various ways. In Queens at St. Michael’s Cemetery, a memorial run was held to raise money for the Christopher Santora Scholarship. Santora was a firefighter who lost his life along with 433 of his comrades that Tuesday morning while helping others in the largest rescue attempt in world history. Local civic groups such as the United Community Civic Association will be holding its annual candlelight vigil in McManus Park, one of the largest of its kind in the city.

Other small ways of showing tribute are expressed through simple displays of remembrance including postings on Facebook, lighting candles in front of firehouses and displays of patriotism with the lowering of American flags.

Despite some controversy, the memorials at Ground Zero continue as they justly should for all time.

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