2012-06-20 / Features

Astoria Native Discusses The Manhattan Project


Manhattan Project engineer and Astoria native Meyer Steinberg Sr. spoke at the Greater Astoria Historical Society. Manhattan Project engineer and Astoria native Meyer Steinberg Sr. spoke at the Greater Astoria Historical Society. Sixty years ago, the Manhattan Project was conceived as a research and development program, led by the United States with participation from the United Kingdom and Canada. The Manhattan Project produced the first atomic bomb that was used during World War II.

Astoria native Meyer Steinberg Sr., once a chemical engineer at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, who worked on the project that ushered in the Atomic Age, was the guest speaker at the Greater Astoria Historical Society. Steinberg, 87, and the holder of 32 patents, gave a riveting account of his role in one of the most important aspects of our history.

Steinberg, as he discussed the atomic bomb, presented a slide show and took questions.

Steinberg explained that initial experiments were conducted in Pupin and Schermerhorn Halls at Columbia University, thus the name, the Manhattan Project. He went on to say that nearly everyone born before 1970 has a percentage of plutonium in their system because of the chemicals in the food and water. He was told by his doctor that he has about 10,000 times more than the average person due to his close proximity to the chemical at the time he was working on The Manhattan Project. Despite the high percentage Steinberg said he is in fine health.

Return to top

Copyright 1999-2018 The Service Advertising Group, Inc. All rights reserved.