2012-03-07 / Political Page

Three Scenarios For Turner Race In November

Under two scenarios, the possibility of Turner and Congressmember Joseph Crowley facing each other, is created.

In another, there’s the possibility of Turner running against Congressmember Gary Ackerman, but only if Ackerman defeats Crowley, the Queens Democratic chairman, in a Democratic primary.

In the third possibility, state senate Republicans would propose keeping his present district as it is —split between Queens and Brooklyn—creating the chance that Turner would face Assemblymember Rory Lancman, who’s considering challenging Turner if the final district maps approved leave the 9th CD unchanged.

In Albany, Assembly Democrats and state senate Republicans, each of whom are the controlling party in their house, late last week reportedly made changes in the district maps they had initially proposed. These changes were then reported by Albany newsmen as stories.


Under two scenarios, the possibility of Turner and Congressmember Joseph Crowley facing each other, is created. in the third possibility Turner would face Assemblymember Rory Lancman. Under two scenarios, the possibility of Turner and Congressmember Joseph Crowley facing each other, is created. in the third possibility Turner would face Assemblymember Rory Lancman. Meanwhile, a special magistrate appointed by a federal judge has been assigned to redraw New York state’s congressional lines by next Monday, March 12. The order was issued because the state legislature failed to complete and approve the redistricting by a given date. However, both houses of the legislature are scrambling to complete the new lines which will be based on the 2010 census figures.

If the legislative lines are completed, it is possible that Governor Andrew Cuomo will veto those lines and set off a legal battle. It is not known whether the court appointed magistrate will step aside and allow the congressional lines drawn by legislative leaders to take precedence over the lines drawn by the federal magistrate.

The stories reported about redistricting changes done in Albany also included the proposed congressional district eliminations that must be done because the state experienced population changes that were recorded in the 2010 census.

As for congressional district eliminations, the various proposals made by the two houses were to: eliminate a seat upstate held by a Democrat who is retiring; eliminate the Queens/Nassau seat presently held by Congressmember Gary Ackerman; merge the districts held by Ackerman and Nassau Congressmember Carolyn McCarthy; eliminate Turner’s district.

Getting back to possible pairings against Turner, a Republican, by Democratic Congressmembers Crowley and Ackerman, Turner would be facing two longtime veterans in each contest.

Crowley is presently in his seventh term and Ackerman has served for about 25 years, so both are seasoned campaigners. Just as important, both are powerful Democrats who would be able to access considerable amounts of campaign funding and ample support, especially Crowley, who is the Queens Democratic chairman.


capability issue, and President Barack Obama’s latest pronouncements on the issues involved, Lancman stated: “The president’s (Obama’s) words were very encouraging, and the fact that he refuses to take any options off the table regarding Iran’s nuclear program shows that he understands the gravity of the threat faced by Israel and by Jews around the world.” We also asked Turner for a comment on Obama’s most recent pronouncements on Israel and Iran, but we had not received any by press time. Turner, meanwhile, responded: “The president has gone from a policy of deterrence capability issue, and President Barack Obama’s latest pronouncements on the issues involved, Lancman stated: “The president’s (Obama’s) words were very encouraging, and the fact that he refuses to take any options off the table regarding Iran’s nuclear program shows that he understands the gravity of the threat faced by Israel and by Jews around the world.” We also asked Turner for a comment on Obama’s most recent pronouncements on Israel and Iran, but we had not received any by press time. Turner, meanwhile, responded: “The president has gone from a policy of deterrence If Turner was able to muster Jewish support against Assemblymember David Weprin, whom he defeated last September, he would find this to be much more difficult against either Crowley or Ackerman, who are both foreign policy veterans.

As for Lancman, he is a 43-years-old, five year Assemblymember from the Fresh Meadows-Flushing area. Lancman also has a well established pro-Israel record. Commenting on the present Iranian nuclear to a policy of prevention and I applaud his decision. To that end, we should ensure Israel has the most up-to-date intelligence on Iran and a public commitment to share other resources when needed.”

NEW SETBACK FOR LIU: The arrest last week of the second high level fundraiser for City Comptroller John Liu’s 2013 mayoral campaign continues the serious damages to his political ambitions. Certain newspapers have been quick to decide that his mayoral hopes have already been shattered, but the public official from Flushing steadfastly maintains that his campaign will go forward.

Following the arrest of Liu’s campaign treasurer Jia Hou, 25, also from Queens, Liu maintained “We’ll figure out how to move forward from here,” indicating he is remaining in the race.

Also in the early running are City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, Public Advocate Bill de Blasio, Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer and former City Comptroller William Thompson.

Hou was charged with fraud and obstruction of justice by federal investigators, but unlike the arrest of Xing Wu Pan, also a fundraiser for Liu, several weeks ago, there were indications that the new set of circumstances involved in Hou’s arrest could be more serious for Liu.

There was also some speculation in news reports that Hou might be in a position to seek leniency if found guilty because her position as campaign treasurer brought much more knowledge of the campaign to her attention.

Although Liu said after the arrest that he would find a way to continue in the mayoral race, a veteran of the political wars in New York City, former Mayor Ed Koch was quoted as saying in one news story:

“John Liu is toast. I expect John Liu will step down before his term is over.”

GIANARIS BLASTS BRYANT, LICHS CLOSINGS: State Senator Michael Gianaris (D–Astoria) characterized the proposed Department of Education plan to shut down Long Island City H.S. and Bryant H.S. as “political posturing” that ignores the affect the action will have on students.

Gianaris said the DOE “should realize this proposal does not factor how such an extreme overhaul” of the local high schools “would affect attending students and how they learn”.

The lawmaker declared: “Children’s education should supercede political posturing, which only further disrupts students’ time in the classroom. The city must keep the interests of our children at the forefront of their minds and reconsider this invasive proposal.”

The DOE plan to improve 33 schools throughout the city, also includes Grover Cleveland, Flushing, August Martin, John Adams, Newtown and Richmond Hill High Schools in Queens. The DOE proposal allows it to apply for $60 million in federal funds.

Queens parents also criticized the move, as did Assemblymember Aravella Simotas (D–Astoria) and Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer (D–Sunnyside).

Simotas declared, “I don’t know how you tell 11th graders that next year half the teachers and the staff who have been helping them will not be there.”

Van Bramer declared, “I don’t know how this improves the lives or futures of the students.”

MAYOR’S WAVING THE WALLET AGAIN: When Mayor Bloomberg was fighting to gain control of the city’s school system, there were crucial times when he was successful in swaying fence sitters to come down on his side of the issue. Later on he might have had occasion to thank the persons involved with campaign financial aid, or whatever might have been their predicament.

Now the issue is state and city pension reform and again the mayor feels it’s another situation where a few bucks spent at the right time will do a world of good, like saving the state government $113 billion during the next 30 years by Governor Andrew Cuomo’s reckoning.

The mayor was in Albany last Wednesday to chat with officials there about how the governor’s pension reform effort is progressing and a savvy reporter asked him frankly if this would be one of those instances where the rubber band would come off the bankroll again.

The mayor responded just as frankly and bluntly:

“You can rest assured that I will support those people at a national level, at a state level and at a city level, on both sides of the aisle that I think I have the courage to stand up and do what’s right for the country that I love, the state that I love and the city that I’m lucky enough to be an employee of…”

Bloomberg joined mayors and officials from around the state in visiting state officials and legislators to say a good word for the governor’s plan.

The mayor also was at his feisty best in a give-and-take with Governor Chris Christie of New Jersey on the issue of NYPD surveillance of Muslims in Christie’s state.

Christie’s complaint boiled down to accusations that the NYPD behaved as if “their jurisdiction is the world…”

Bloomberg responded that the department was not going out of bounds.

“What we’ve been doing in New Jersey is what anybody in this country or in this world can do. You can go to open meetings and you can go on open Web sites and look and see what’s there, and that’s really all we’ve been doing.

“We have a responsibility to do that, and we share the information with New Jersey.”

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