2011-11-23 / Features

Zombie Walk Terrorizes Astoria



On November 19, the undead of Queens gathered in Astoria for the first annual Thanksgiving Zombie Walk on 30th Avenue. Residents met at Club 21, 30-09 21st St., to socialize and get “infected”—in other words, have a few drinks and have professional and student make-up artists transform them into zombies. They then took to the streets to march, Karling terrorize and spread the zombie fun. The event was hosted by Walter Zombies Can’t Love, Zombies Worldwide and Astoria Music & Arts. Astoria Music & Arts is a Photos nonprofit group dedicated to promoting the arts in Astoria, from local rock shows to art exhibitions to, apparently, zombie invasions. In short, the event was attended by those fond of the new supernatural fad who wanted to bring it to the public. The festivities even included fake blood and intestines that “bystanders” and “victims” shot out upon being attacked by the crowd. Those who organized the event said that, despite any political undertones the march might have had, it was mostly for the purpose of having fun. Some saw it as a symbol for Wall Street and the country’s bleak economic future while most simply wanted to get a bit dirty and play pretend. The parade ended at The Shillelagh Tavern, 47-22 30th Ave., where several Astoria Music & Arts bands played to celebrate the first annual event.—Cristina Guarino On November 19, the undead of Queens gathered in Astoria for the first annual Thanksgiving Zombie Walk on 30th Avenue. Residents met at Club 21, 30-09 21st St., to socialize and get “infected”—in other words, have a few drinks and have professional and student make-up artists transform them into zombies. They then took to the streets to march, Karling terrorize and spread the zombie fun. The event was hosted by Walter Zombies Can’t Love, Zombies Worldwide and Astoria Music & Arts. Astoria Music & Arts is a Photos nonprofit group dedicated to promoting the arts in Astoria, from local rock shows to art exhibitions to, apparently, zombie invasions. In short, the event was attended by those fond of the new supernatural fad who wanted to bring it to the public. The festivities even included fake blood and intestines that “bystanders” and “victims” shot out upon being attacked by the crowd. Those who organized the event said that, despite any political undertones the march might have had, it was mostly for the purpose of having fun. Some saw it as a symbol for Wall Street and the country’s bleak economic future while most simply wanted to get a bit dirty and play pretend. The parade ended at The Shillelagh Tavern, 47-22 30th Ave., where several Astoria Music & Arts bands played to celebrate the first annual event.—Cristina Guarino

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