2011-11-09 / Features

Origins Of Veterans’ Day


President Eisenhower signs HR7786, officially changing Armistice Day to Veterans’ Day. 
Courtesy of theEisenhowerPresidential libraryand museum. President Eisenhower signs HR7786, officially changing Armistice Day to Veterans’ Day. Courtesy of theEisenhowerPresidential libraryand museum. The commemoration of Armistice Day was recognized in the United States with a proclamation from President Woodrow Wilson in 1919, with the words:

"To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations…"

Congress passed a resolution in 1926 inviting all States to observe the day a letter-writing campaign to secure the support of all state governors in the observance of this new holiday.

On June 1, 1954, the name of the holiday known as Armistice Day was changed to Veterans’ Day as a tribute for the nobility of all soldiers who have fought for or who are fighting for the United States.

In 1968, new legislation changed the national commemoration of Veterans’ Day to the fourth Monday in October. It soon became apparent that November 11 was a date of historic significance to many Americans. In 1978 Congress returned the observance to its traditional date.

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