2011-04-20 / Features

Assembly Passes Meng’s Bill To Continue Human Trafficking Fight

BY JOHN TOSCANO


Meng commended Queens District Attorney Richard A. Brown “on his continuous efforts in combating this growing problem in Queens...” Meng commended Queens District Attorney Richard A. Brown “on his continuous efforts in combating this growing problem in Queens...” By increasing efforts to fight human trafficking, Assemblymember Grace Meng (D–Flushing) is determined to eliminate this form of modern day slavery. Meng’s legislation to extend a task force’s efforts to curb the illegal sale of people for the purposes of sexual slavery and forced labor has been passed by the Assembly.

The bill, Meng said, would allow the current Interagency Task Force on Human Trafficking to continue curbing the illegal practice of selling people for the purposes of sex or work by strengthening trafficking prevention, directing victims to agencies that provide needed services and increasing public awareness of human trafficking.

Meng explained, “Countless New Yorkers, including children, families and loved ones, are victimized each year and the results can be devastating.

“The Assembly’s package of bills was created to enhance protection, increase victim advocacy, lessen financial repercussions for crime victims and help decrease violent crimes across the state, helping to give New Yorkers peace of mind.”

Meng commended Queens District Attorney Richard A. Brown “on his continuous efforts in combating this growing problem in Queens and for convicting literally the first person under New York’s landmark human trafficking legislation. We need to do more to partner with these victims”.

Meng also made reference to the problem and efforts to deal with it on the federal level.

The lawmaker reported that in the U.S. Department of State’s most recent report on efforts to combat human trafficking globally, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton reported that sadly, for the very first time, the U.S. has been included on the list of high priority countries.

According to the State Department, Meng continued, approximately 20,000 persons per year are trafficked into the United States. New York state ranks among the top five states.

“These facts,” Meng said, “further demonstrate the need for New York to continue the three P’s, punishment, protection and prevention to eliminate this form of modern slavery.”

Meng concluded, “One of society’s most hideous crimes happens right here in our state, the illegal trade of humans, often children, for sex and work. The Assembly has passed a bill that would extend the human trafficking task force for another two years as it continues finding solutions to this heinous practice.”

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