2010-04-07 / Front Page

Girl Scouts Get $305K+

BY JASON D. ANTOS

Congressmember Carolyn Maloney (third from l.), Vice President for Communications of Girl Scouts Denise Pesich, Chair of the Girl Scouts of Greater New York Patricia Stensrud and Girl Scouts from Troops Nos. 4435, 4566, 4567 and 4586 at Immaculate Conception School, Long Island City and the International Buddhist Progress Society of Flushing, posed with a specimen check for $305,875 presented by Congress to Girl Scouts of the USA in support of the organization’s Financial Literacy Program, intended to help girls and young women become financially self-reliant. The presentation took place at Maloney’s district office, 28-11 Astoria Blvd., Astoria. Photo Jason D. Antos Congressmember Carolyn Maloney (third from l.), Vice President for Communications of Girl Scouts Denise Pesich, Chair of the Girl Scouts of Greater New York Patricia Stensrud and Girl Scouts from Troops Nos. 4435, 4566, 4567 and 4586 at Immaculate Conception School, Long Island City and the International Buddhist Progress Society of Flushing, posed with a specimen check for $305,875 presented by Congress to Girl Scouts of the USA in support of the organization’s Financial Literacy Program, intended to help girls and young women become financially self-reliant. The presentation took place at Maloney’s district office, 28-11 Astoria Blvd., Astoria. Photo Jason D. Antos Congressmember Carolyn Maloney (D-Queens/Manhattan), joined by Vice President for Communications of Girl Scouts Denise Pesich and Chair of the Girl Scouts of Greater New York Patricia Stensrud, announced on April 6 that she had secured $305,875 in federal appropriations for the Girl Scouts of the USA. The money, given by Congress, will be used to develop the organization’s Financial Literacy Program, a comprehensive and universal initiative to help young girls better manage their finances. Maloney was also joined by Troops Nos. 4435, 4566, 4567 and 4586 from Immaculate Conception School of Long Island City and the International Buddhist Progress Society of Flushing, who proudly displayed their badge- and award-covered uniforms as Maloney presented a specimen check for the amount at her district office, 28-11 Astoria Blvd., Astoria.

“The Girl Scouts are an extraordinarily effective and inspirational organization that was founded to give girls an opportunity to develop self-reliance and resourcefulness,” Maloney, a former Girl Scout, said. “In today’s world, we understand that one of the most important skills girls can learn is financial self-reliance.”

The Girl Scouts, who are currently in the process of updating and expanding their financial literacy programming for the 2.6 million Scouts of all ages, plan to create cutting-edge technologies, digital enhancements and other online tools to develop financial literacy among girls in all six levels of Girls Scouting including Daisy, Brownie, Junior, Cadette, Senior and Ambassador.

“Girl Scouts of the USA applauds Congressmember Carolyn Maloney for supporting our financial literacy efforts,” Girl Scouts of the USA Chief Executive Officer, Kathy Cloninger said in a statement. “Congressmember Maloney recognizes that being financially savvy is one of the important areas for girls on the road to success.”

Future plans also include the creation of a nationwide network of mentors, coaches, guides and experts who will serve as role models for girls, supplemented by DVDs, training modules and other tools for parents and volunteers. A mentorship program with local businesswomen is also planned for the Scouts. Web-based materials and Spanish language translation will be created to ensure the program’s success.

“We are the premier organization for young girls to learn about self-reliance and self-respect,” Stensrud said.

The concept of financial responsibility has always been a part of the Girl Scouts in the form of their famous cookie sales.

“Girl Scouts who go door to door selling cookies help raise money for the organization and learn the importance of earning money and money management,” Pesich said. Girl Scout Cookie sales have earned $700 million to date.

The sale of Girl Scout Cookies as a way to finance troop activities began with the Mistletoe Troop in Muskogee, Oklahoma, which baked cookies and sold them in a high school cafeteria as a service project in December 1917.

Juliette “Daisy” Gordon Low founded the Girl Scouts on Mar. 12, 1912 in Savannah, Georgia when she assembled 18 girls for the first meeting. The organization has since grown to 3.4 million members throughout the United States, including U.S. territories and in more than 90 countries through Girl Scouts USA Overseas.

The goal of the Girls Scouts is to bring young girls out of isolated home environments and into the open air with hiking, basketball, camping trips, community service and first aid studies. Today, more than 50 million women in the U.S. are Girl Scout alumnae. There are currently 22,000 Girls Scouts in New York City, with 6,000 in Queens County.

“As important as it is to learn how to light a one-match fire, it is far more important to learn how to open a bank account, balance a check book and save for the future,” Maloney said.

For more information, visit www.girlscouts.org.

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