2007-02-14 / Features

New York Hospital Queens Starts $200 M Expansion

BY DAN MILLER

(L. to r.): Queens Borough President Helen Marshall; Eugene Lang; William W. H. Chiang, Board of Trustees (partial view); Theresa Lang, Board of Trustees; state Senator Toby Ann Stavisky; NYHQ President and Chief Executive Officer Stephen S. Mills; City Councilmember John Liu; Board of Trustees Chairman George Heinrich, M.D.; Former Queens Borough President Claire Shulman; Assemblymember Ellen Young; Bruce Bendell, member of the Board of Trustees; City Councilmember Tony Avella, and David H. Snyder, M.D. president, Medical Staff Society. (L. to r.): Queens Borough President Helen Marshall; Eugene Lang; William W. H. Chiang, Board of Trustees (partial view); Theresa Lang, Board of Trustees; state Senator Toby Ann Stavisky; NYHQ President and Chief Executive Officer Stephen S. Mills; City Councilmember John Liu; Board of Trustees Chairman George Heinrich, M.D.; Former Queens Borough President Claire Shulman; Assemblymember Ellen Young; Bruce Bendell, member of the Board of Trustees; City Councilmember Tony Avella, and David H. Snyder, M.D. president, Medical Staff Society. On Friday, February 9, New York Hospital Queens broke ground for a new $50 million expansion project. The new facility will combine all cardiovascular services for heart patients on one floor, including operating rooms, catheterization labs and offices for doctors, establish a new ambulatory surgery center and make infrastructure improvements. The modernization project will include a new parking facility with two levels below ground and one at street level.

According to hospital executives, this new major modernization is designed to add capacity and services to a thriving community teaching hospital. The modernization is needed so that the institution can serve the fast-growing population of the surrounding community and provide Queens residents with access to high quality health care close to home.

New York Hospital Queens commemorative groundbreaking cake. New York Hospital Queens commemorative groundbreaking cake. Queens Borough President Helen Marshall and her predecessor, Claire Shulman, were joined by supporters of New York Hospital Queens to witness the groundbreaking ceremony. Marshall has called for an expansion of hospital beds in Queens.

Hospital medical and administrative staff, board members and guests, local and state elected officials and leaders from the New York-Presbyterian Healthcare System also attended the ceremony. "In today's precarious environment for hospitals, we are fortunate to embark upon a program that will expand healthcare access for the residents of Queens," New York Hospital Queens President and Chief Executive Officer Stephen S. Mills said. "We believe that people must have high quality medical services, and trusted expertise, right in their own backyard."

The firm Barr & Barr will construct the expansion, the second major construction project at New York Hospital Queens. In 1999, then Mayor Rudolph Giuliani broke ground for a $147 million facility modernization that added 200 beds.

According to the 2000 Census, since 1996 the population of Queens has grown by12.5 percent and that of Flushing by 10.2 percent. New York Hospital Queens is currently at or near capacity in many critical areas. Emergency Room visits have risen by more than 30,000, with nearly 80,000 people documented as visiting New York Hospital Queens in 2006, with more patients anticipated in 2007. New York Hospital Queens has a 97 percent occupancy rate for all surgical/medical beds.

During the construction phase of this expansion, New York Hospital Queens has set up a hotline for all public questions or to report any problems at 718- 670-1713.

New York Hospital Queens, a member of the New York-Presbyterian Healthcare System and affiliated with Weill Medical College of Cornell University, is located at 50-45 Main St., Flushing; 718-670- 1065. For more information, visit www.nyhq.org.

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